Here is how you inhibit renewable energy in your town.

You write an “add on” to an ordinance prepared by your Planning Board without consulting them. This ordinance makes it so that if you want to put solar on your property, and you want that system to power your house, and generate income as a little cottage industry by selling to the grid, you need to go through a site plan, go in front of the planning board, ask for a variance, put large amounts of money in escrow, hire engineers, and then, after all those things are paid for, and months and months have gone by, you can put in your solar system. If you do a system that is just what you use, you are fine; but if you want to farm the sun, you are in need of a variance. I applied for a variance once. It took about a year to go through the process and it cost me thousands of dollars. This ordinance makes it thousands of dollars more expensive to generate some power for the grid, and makes the process of putting in solar long and drawn out.

Develop theme around utopian thinking… Focus one’s attention on the notion that “wind and solar are now an ‘inherently beneficial use’ in residential, commercial, and industrial zones.” We should not have ordinances that prohibit the “beneficial use” of solar and wind, and limiting it in an arbitrary fashion is not allowed on county or state level.

In December it was decided that the solar ordinance in Frelinghuysenfolly would be revised, but it was tabled in January. Will new wording be provided by after 2 months? Couldn’t we undo the ordinance we have, until it is correct, with zoning based on facts rather than arbitrary conditions?

Question on the table:
What about the % of production? Can a local municipality limit % of production on someone’s land? Answer: “Not in an arbitrary fashion.” Here are some actual facts.

  • 6Kkw is considered standard home
  • 10kw system is considered ideal home production size
  • Various speakers spoke about production size being 1) annual use, plus 2) power generator back- up of that same use, so maximum home solar size per home would be about 12 kw as “normal.”
  • Farm scales recommended by State and County at 2mvolts per 10 acres; plus proper meadow and grass mixes maintained by animals, buffering, safety, and fencing.

Suggested background reading on topic to be well versed for conversation!

Solar Advancement Act of 2010

http://www.njlandlaw.com/archives/768

http://www.srectrade.com/blog/srec-markets/new-jersey/solar-srec-requirement-increase

http://energybusinessdaily.com/power/new-jersey-passes-slew-of-renewable-energy-laws/

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